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Price named SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Fellow

Michael Childs

September 23, 2014

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University of Georgia College of Education graduate student LaTasha Price has been named a 2014-State Doctoral Fellow by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB).

As an SREB-state doctoral fellow, Price's graduate study will be funded through a partnership between the SREB, UGA and state funding sources. The award consists of up to five years of tuition for fall, spring and summer semesters from UGA, up to three years of a $20,000 annual state-funded stipend and funds from the SREB to attend professional development activities.

Price, of Macon, is a third-year doctoral student in language and literacy education, advised by UGA Distinguished Research Professor Donna Alvermann. She also works as a College Success Coach at Central Georgia Technical College.

A native of Lynchburg, Virginia, Price aspires to be an artist/professor who influences young educators to infuse arts-based pedagogy in their daily practice.

"When I realized that my arts-based classroom practice consistently 'worked' with at-risk students, I wanted to be able to articulate it so that diverse audiences could also implement the practices in their own classrooms, after-school programs and educational groups," she said.

Price received her bachelor's degree in electronic media from James Madison University and her master's degree in education from Georgia College and State University.

More than one-third of America's college students are people of color. But the percentages of minority college and university faculty are only small fractions of the total. Nationwide, about 5 percent of faculty are African American, about 3 percent are Hispanic and about 1 percent are Native American.

The SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program's goal is to produce more minority Ph.D. students who seek careers as faculty on college campuses. Today, after more than 20 years, the program has exceeded its 700th minority Ph.D. graduate. Since its founding in 1993, the Doctoral Scholars Program has supported more than 1,200 scholars at 94 institutions in 29 states.