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Professor named president-elect of school psychology society

Kathryn Kao

August 24, 2017

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Scott Ardoin, professor and head of the department of educational psychology, was recently named president-elect of the Society for the Study of School Psychology (SSSP). During his three-year term, which begins January 2018, Ardoin will serve as president-elect, president and past president of the exclusive society.

SSSP is a nonprofit and invitation-only organization focused on recognizing and supporting scholarship and research. Invitations to join SSSP are generally only extended to those whose research has made a significant impact on the field of school psychology.

Members of SSSP conduct research in a variety of areas and work to improve the behavior and academic performance of school-aged students, including through refining assessments, improving instructional practices and enhancing the collaboration between homes and schools.

SSSP accomplishes its mission through the organization’s publication, the Journal of School Psychology, and through initiatives such as the Dissertation Grant Award, Early Career Research Award, International Research Award, and the School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference.

“We’re always looking for new avenues that might help school psychology students and faculty improve upon the research being conducted in the field of school psychology, and this often amounts to providing researchers with funding through competitive grants,” said Ardoin. “One easy way that members can promote excellent research is through informing junior faculty of the grant opportunities that the organization offers and then mentoring them while they conduct their research.”

As president of SSSP, Ardoin plans to develop a new research-based conference for school psychology researchers and assess the impact of the organization’s awards on both early-career and mid-career scholars.

In 2007, Ardoin was named the APA Division 16 Lightner Witmer Early Career Scholar and has since helped three doctoral students at the University of Georgia win dissertation grants from the SSSP.