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Summary

We aim to simultaneously meet the immediate needs of educators as they teach through COVID-19 and inform sustainable policies that support educators’ humanizing distance learning pedagogies. Examining sustainable humanizing distance learning approaches has the potential to redress persistent educational inequities that youth of color experience in schools, even when we return to face-to-face teaching.

Abstract

On March 16, 2020, five days after the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic, Learning for Justice (formerly Teaching Tolerance), issued a survey to U.S. educators, asking what they need right now to teach through COVID-19.

The 2,000 respondents said they felt “incredible responsibilities” for their students’ learning and well-being. Consequently, educators requested a wide range of resources, including:

  1. Emotional support (for teachers and students)
  2. Curricular materials that address the intersections of COVID-19 and social justice
  3. Best practices for online learning

With consideration for the inequitable contexts of public schools pre-COVID-19 and the requested educator resources, we developed a yearlong professional development (PD) course for practicing educators (pre and in-service) that promotes equitable education.

In our PD, we cultivate what we call, humanizing distance learning (HDL) pedagogies with/in an intergenerational community of practice of 100 preK-12 educators. This study illuminates: (1) the nature of exemplary teachers' HDL pedagogies and (2) how a community of practicing educators leverage HDL pedagogies with youth of color during distance learning.

We aim to simultaneously meet the immediate needs of educators as they teach through COVID-19 and inform sustainable policies that support educators’ HDL pedagogies. Examining sustainable HDL approaches has the potential to redress persistent educational inequities that youth of color experience in schools, even when we return to face-to-face teaching.

Sponsor

University of Maryland Foundation, Inc; Maryland State Department of Education Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund
$151,332

Principal Investigator

Keisha Allen, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland

Co-PIs

Sakeena Everett

Assistant Professor, Language and Literacy Education

Kindel Nash

Associate Professor, University of Maryland

Active Since

August 2020