Skip to page content

This 1,500-square-foot lab is dedicated to the development of new noninvasive methods of measuring skeletal muscle and blood vessel function. These methods are then applied to the study of how activity and inactivity influence the health of people with chronic diseases and injuries.

Equipment

Comprising one large room and one small room, we have a total of four examination/testing stations. The stations are each capable of both arm and leg cardiovascular and metabolic measurements, including two motorized adjustable exam tables. Our equipment includes:

  • Two portable ultrasound units (both from GE Medical)
  • Continuous blood pressure monitor (Finometer, MIDI)
  • Portable Vascular Laboratory (Biomedix)
  • Three Biopac data acquisition units (MP100 and MP150) with numerous physiological modules
  • Three Hokanson rapid cuff inflators with three 10- to 30-gallon commercial air compressors
  • Three ankle and one knee extensor ergometers; one of these is nonmagnetic for use in the BIRC
  • Digital finger flexor ergometers
  • 12 electrical stimulators including one Grass and one Digitimer
  • Four different NIRS devices (Artinis Portamon, Artinis Oxymon, Nonin, and 16-channel Cogniscope from NIM, Inc.)

Contact Details

Ramsey Center Room 107D
706-542-3258

Affiliated Faculty

Research

  • Electrical stimulation training of people with spinal cord injuries (NIH)
  • Muscle metabolism and blood flow in people with peripheral arterial disease (Novartis and American Heart Association)
  • Analysis of muscle mitochondrial capacity and muscle blood flow in various patient populations (Biogen, Novartis)
  • Muscle mitochondrial capacity in divers after prolonged submersion (Navy Experimental Diving Station)
  • Muscle mitochondrial function in people with genetically identified mitochondrial disease
  • The influence of resveratrol on muscle mitochondrial capacity
  • Development of a new fatigue test
  • Determination of the effect of exercise on post-prandial glucose levels in people with diabetes
  • Muscle blood flow