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Project BE-AHEAD offers evidence-based training in the areas of behavioral health and integrated care to student trainees in three nationally renowned graduate-level behavioral health programs at the University of Georgia:

  • PhD in Counseling Psychology
  • MEd in Community Counseling
  • MEd in School Counseling

The project seeks to expand the behavioral health workforce in underserved communities throughout Northeast Georgia and to evaluate the effectiveness of the program's training of students in interprofessional services and behavioral health competency.

The Fellowship

Project BE-AHEAD provides the opportunity for students to receive training, supervision, and practicum experience in evidence-based interventions and integrative behavioral health-primary care services. The project offers a stipend to support internship work in specified integrative healthcare settings. We have developed collaborative relationships with integrative healthcare sites that welcome the opportunity to work with psychology/counselors in training.

Fellowship commitments include:

  • Attending seminars relevant to training in integrated healthcare services
  • Enrollment in a health psychology course offering training in evidence-based approaches effective in addressing mental and behavioral health concerns
  • Completing surveys at the start and end of the fellowship year, as well as post-graduation

As part of our program, group supervision further builds skills in case conceptualization, diagnosis, and treatment planning, while individual supervision fosters skill development through exploration of your clinical cases. Fellows will attend case presentations in early December and present cases in the spring. The dates and times for these presentations will be announced.

Apply Today!

Fellows are selected based on applicants' fit with the program goal of training integrative healthcare professionals.

Download an application

Applications are due in mid-September with interviews taking place in mid-October.

Our Fellowship Sites

  • Advantage Behavioral Health Systems
  • Banyan Tree Center
  • Barrow County School System
  • Clarke County School District
  • Commerce City Schools
  • Elbert County School District
  • Foothills Education Charter High School
  • Georgia Department of Public Health
  • Greene County Schools
  • Jackson County School System
  • Jefferson City Schools
  • Live Forward
  • Madison County School District
  • Mercy Health Center
  • Northeast Georgia Regional Educational Service Agency
  • Oconee County Schools
  • Oglethorpe County School System
  • Rutland Academy
  • Social Circle City Schools
  • Treehouse
  • Walton County School District

Our Team

Portrait of Bernadette Davantes Heckman

Bernadette Davantes Heckman

Principal Investigator

Portrait of Georgia Calhoun

Georgia Calhoun

Co-Principal Investigator

Portrait of Jolie Daigle

Jolie Daigle

Co-Principal Investigator

Portrait of Lauren Bigham

Lauren Bigham

Co-Project Manager

Research Assistants

Alexandria Rogers

Rogers is a second-year counseling psychology PhD student. She obtained her master of family therapy degree from Drexel University. She is researching the link between chronic migraines and trauma history. She is seeing patients at Mercy Health Center.

JungSu Oh

Oh is a fourth-year counseling psychology PhD student. He received his master's degree in education counseling from Seoul National University. Prior to this project, he participated in the LIHNKS (Linking Integrated Health Networks for Kids in Schools) project as a research assistant.

Jeffrey Okun

Okun is a fourth-year counseling psychology PhD student. He received his master's degree in clinical mental health counseling from Marquette University. Okun is the program coordinator for Project LIHNKS. His research interests are with the Deaf population and health.

Former Team Members

James McDonald

McDonald joined the team as a counseling psychology PhD student in the fall of 2017. He received a master's in clinical mental health counseling from Marquette University and a bachelor's in health psychology from Bastyr University. His research and clinical interests are with underserved populations in an integrated care setting.

Katherine Crosby Gross

Gross joined the team as a counseling psychology student in the spring of 2018 with a background in community counseling. Her clinical work has focused on working with traditionally marginalized and underserved populations across the lifespan in community-based mental health and interdisciplinary settings.

News

2018-2019 Fellows

Jeffrey Okun

Jeffrey is a fourth year Counseling Psychology PhD student. He currently practices at the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta, GA.

JungSu Oh

JungSu is a fourth year Counseling Psychology PhD student. His role in this fellowship includes clinical work at Live Forward (formally known as AIDS Athens) and research assistance for the BE-AHEAD project.

Bret Ringdahl

Sarah Rupnaraine

Sarah Rupnaraine is in her 4th year in the Counseling Psychology Ph.D. Program. She began working on the fellowship in the 2018-2019 school year. Sarah's time on the fellowship consists of work at Live Forward, formally known as AIDS Athens. Her roles there include developing and leading group psychotherapy, attending, case conference meetings, communication and consultation with other staff members, leading staff trainings as well as individual psychotherapy.

Jonathan Shay

Jonathan is a 4th year student in UGA's Counseling Psychology Program and is practicing at Mercy Health Center in Athens, GA. His interests include working with patients from diverse backgrounds, sustainable health practices, technology, and the intersection of these in health-psychology research and therapy. His hobbies include mountain biking, fly fishing, and watching UGA football with family and friends.

Fellow Spotlights

Portrait of Sarah Rupnaraine

Sarah Rupnaraine

Sarah Rupnaraine is a 4th year doctoral candidate fellow currently serving at Live Forward, a non-profit organization serving HIV+ clients.

Ms. Rupnaraine is recognized as this month's Be Ahead Fellow of the Month for her dedication to her clinic work and excellence with client care.

When describing her current setting, Ms. Rupnaraine explained her role is interdisciplinary in nature. She noted that while team members work together on client care, the approach at Live Forward is more consultative, based on a case-by-case basis.

Ms. Rupnaraine stated she conducts traditional psychotherapy through individual and group settings as well as acting as a consultant as needed. Ms. Rupnaraine offers telehealth services to clients in more rural areas who are unable to commute into the Athens locations.

Additionally, she is involved in training master's level students as well as hosting seminars based on the staff needs at her current site. Some examples of seminars include training on suicide and suicidal ideation, overview of mental health and trauma, and motivational interviewing. She added the motivational interviewing seminar was requested with hopes of increasing client engagement. As a non-profit, Live Forward receives federal funding and must in return demonstrate client needs are being addressed. The goal of this training was to equip the providers with additional tools to promote client engagement in services offered thus allowing the facility to meet the needs of the clients.

When highlighting some of the greatest lessons learned from her current placement, Ms. Rupnaraine said "this is a unique client population where I am working with multiple intersecting identities with each individual. For example, a client may be a racial minority, HIV +, and part of the LGBTQ community." Almost all of the clients served at Live Forward fall below the national poverty line and are served at Live Forward for multiple services, such as housing funding. Additionally, it is not uncommon for the typical client to receive government assistance, which can further feed into one's feelings of marginalization.

Ms. Rupnaraine reported working at this site has allowed her to experience working with complex mental health needs complicated by socio-economic difficulties and concerns. Ms. Rupnaraine noted these experiences have helped prepare her for her long-term career goal of working in an integrated health setting. She went on to say she is open to working for non-profits or in a VA setting. Lastly, she advised students who are interested in this fellowship to learn as much as they can in the Health Psychology courses and while on their sites as these skills have helped prepare her for her daily duties. She noted this position is truly a great merger of the counseling psychology and health psychology roles!

Ms. Rupnaraine stated one lesson she has learned on her clinic training journey is to care for oneself. She said she uses a prioritization checklist to sort her task and help maintain her focus. She added she utilizes meal prep and regular exercise as forms of self-care and stress relief, which are needed when working with complex cases. Ms. Rupnaraine noted she also reserves time for activities she enjoys such as being outdoors, hiking, visiting parks, and engaging in fall activities. Securing this time allows Ms. Rupnaraine to be a better-rounded clinician and better serve her current setting.

Please continue congratulating Ms. Rupnaraine on her earned recognition as Fellow of the Month. Her dedication deserves to be applauded. Thank you Ms. Rupnaraine for continuing to serve those underserved! Good luck as you move forward.

Portrait of JungSu Oh

JungSu Oh

JungSu Oh is a 4th year doctoral candidate fellow currently serving at Live Forward, a non-profit organization serving HIV+ clients, and UGA's Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS). CAPS is Mr. Oh's primary placement. CAPS serves students who attend UGA. Mr. Oh is recognized as this month's Be Ahead Fellow of the Month for his devotion to serving clients wholeheartedly and his dedication to help overcome health-related inequities.

Mr. Oh described CAPS as a co-located counseling center, meaning it is housed with other services, such as primary care and psychiatry, which facilitates interdisciplinary collaboration. For example, he noted that, while primary care physicians cannot access the counseling notes, psychiatry can access them to better serve the client's medication needs Mr. Oh noted this site has provided him with an invaluable experience of learning the systems of working in a co-location on a college campus. He explained he has learned more about boundaries and others' roles and has respect for the rules and structures in place to protect clients. Mr. Oh said he mostly conducts individual therapy but is hopeful to become involved with the group therapy next semester.

Mr. Oh highlighted that he experiences the best of both worlds serving clients at two sites. Mr. Oh noted that the clients he serves at Live Forward are significantly more diverse and more underserved than those he sees at CAPS. Mr. Oh described his experience at Live Forward as richly enhancing his skill set as he is exposed to more complicated health concerns and is learning to work with clients truly from a bio-psycho-social model. Mr. Oh stated that completing the health track courses prepared him to conceptualize through this model yet being at Live Forward has allowed him to put those conceptualizations into practice. Mr. Oh added that completing psychopharmacology, in addition to the health psychology course sequence, has been a major asset in allowing him to have a basic understanding of common medications, including best uses and side effects, which has allowed him to have a voice during interprofessional collaboration and conversation.

While Mr. Oh was vocal about his enjoyment of working with clients, he said his dream job, at least during early career, is a combined faculty and research position. Mr. Oh reported he is highly interested in the impact of technology on delivering psychotherapy, particularly as it relates to the development or re-development of evidence-based approaches. Mr. Oh's dissertation is exploring psychotherapy delivered through technology. He noted that with technology ever-evolving, this is a research area that will constantly require updating to understand the impact.

From speaking with Mr. Oh, it was obvious that he stays busy with his fellowship and research. However, Mr. Oh stated "I intentionally take time for myself." He is a self-proclaimed introvert and noted he maintains energy by taking time alone to play video games or do meditation. He stated he needs to make more time for both and is working towards a better balance of self-care.

Thank you Mr. Oh for your dedication and service to both the underserved community population and to our college students. Work like yours is essential. Please congratulate Mr. Oh as January's Fellow of the month! Good luck on your future endeavors!

Portrait of Jonathan Shay

Jonathan Shay

Jonathan Shay is a 4th year doctoral candidate fellow currently serving Mercy Health Center. Jonathan is recognized as the first Be Ahead Fellow of the Month for his outstanding work and ethic. Jonathan's interdisciplinary role has been a valuable experience for him and his service and contributions at Mercy have been invaluable. ​ When interviewed, Mr. Shay was asked about his current placement. Mr. Shay said, "I'm pretty busy!" and added that the busyness gave him real-world experience and expectations of what career life could be like. At Mercy, Mr. Shay stated he completes many triage consultations utilizing a system after the STAT model, which is a system Mr. Shay himself put into place upon realizing the great need for a behavioral health provider to help facilitate the waitlist prioritizing process. Currently, he sees every new patient placed on the psychotherapy waitlist. Through this system, Mr. Shay is able to expedite those needs to are higher risk or need more immediacy to serve as well as make suitable community referrals. As a behavioral health fellow, Mr. Shay is also able to work with some individuals during the intake process to give them starter skills for coping with their stressors. His system is helping reduce the number of clients on the waitlist. Mr. Shay also conducts traditional psychotherapy, groups, and leads educational seminars at Mercy. For example, he hosted a suicide awareness and assessment training in September with the goal of educating and empowering providers of all levels to better assess and respond to at-risk patients.

When Mr. Shay was asked about experiences gained from this site, he explained " There's no better training than real world experience with a supervision safety net. I've learned a lot about underserved and marginalized populations and the barriers that often impede patients' ability to access health services and maintain a healthy lifestyle. I've also learned that assisting patients in a primary care setting has inherent benefits (i.e. interprofessional collaboration) and drawbacks (i.e. stricter time limitations with patients) compared to other settings. " As a follow-up question, Mr. Shay was asked what he did to prepare himself to face the challenges in his current position. He stated "I've worked in a lot of different jobs and organizations with people from different cultures and backgrounds. So, I've seen a lot about how to work with other people and what things work and don't within organizations. I've said "yes" to a lot of things and this has certainly exposed me to a wide variety of patient populations, treatment types, and organizational structures. This is not to say that you should always say "yes," there are plenty of times when saying "no" is the right answer. But if I was to give someone advice it would be say "yes" to new opportunities within your realm of competency, especially those opportunities that are slightly out of your comfort zone.

In closing, Mr. Shay was asked about his future career interest and his current approach to self-care. Mr. Shay acknowledged that he must practice what he preaches in regards to self-care. Mr. Shay replied that self-care can easily fall off your priority list due to busyness but reiterated the importance of incorporating time to take care of oneself. Mr. Shay reported he does this by being in nature and also camping when possible. He indicated that nature allows him room to breathe and reset mentally. Lastly, Mr. Shay reported he would like to work with adults in a consortium or university setting. He added that his long-term plans included obtaining a leadership role where he felt like he could make lasting change in the system where he is employed. Mr. Shay understands that change impacts an entire system and believes as training director or director of behavioral health services he could play a part in making positive changes in the system he is in. We believe, based on the systematic impact Mr. Shay has already made on his fellow site, he will achieve these goals and more. Again, Mr. Shay, you have earned this recognition and many more. Good luck with your future endeavors and congratulations on your achievements!

Portrait of Adriauna Clay

Adriauna Clay

Adriauna Clay is a 2nd year Mental Health Counseling student at the University of Georgia. She is currently doing her internship at Advantage, a community mental health counseling site that serves a diverse group of uninsured people from low SES communities. Advantage offers group counseling, individual counseling, behavioral health assessments, nursing assessments, medical evaluations and other healthcare services. The Project Be Ahead team sat down with Adriauna to learn more about her path to pursuing a career in counseling and what it means to take a break from saving the world in order to give back to herself.

Why did I decide to be in a helping profession?

That's a complicated answer. I definitely entered the field of psychology in high school because I was curious about human behavior in general. I wanted to know why people operated the way they did and what motivated them to engage in certain behaviors. Over time, I realized that I wanted to put practical use to my curiosities and I was drawn to therapy. I was drawn to the idea that through therapy people could change their lives in significant ways. You sound very passionate about psychology – then and now. What motivates and inspires you about this field? What I love about this field is the power of relationship to change individuals' lives. It is amazing to me that giving someone the space and the opportunity to develop a relationship with a helping professional can be so impactful. Watching people change – seeing them become more empowered, more excited about life, more hopeful – is rewarding.

Of all the people you could help – make those changes you mentioned – what specific populations are you most interested in working with? Why?

My populations of clinical interest are individuals from low SES communities, people of global majority (people of color), fat-identified individuals, and others with marginalized identities. I am most interested in working with this population because I also hold many of these identities and understand how they've impacted me. For many marginalized individuals, therapy has been stigmatized as well as inaccessible for them. It is my goal to make therapy more accessible and to destigmatize seeking help for mental health issues, particularly for individuals within the black community.

Based on your population of interest, Advantage sounds like it's a great opportunity for you to serve people of intersecting identities that may often lack access to mental health care services. Tell us more about your role and how you serve patients at Advantage.

My day-to-day responsibilities are mostly related to individual counseling. I see clients for individual therapy, write clinical progress notes, create and update treatment plans, complete documentation for clients to be authorized to receive services, and set appointments with clients. I have recently been observing group counseling sessions with the goal of eventually co-facilitating sessions. I also have individual supervision once a week. You are quite busy! What are a few important things you have learned at your placement? I've learned a lot about the protocols and culture of working for a community service board (CSB). I've become knowledgeable on how state-funded agencies operate and the difficulties that emerge when providing mental health services with cases that are complex and do not fit neatly into a box. In fact, they almost never do. I've come to deeply understand that there is no one way to do therapy. My work at Advantage has excited me to continue my work with this population in the future. Being at Advantage has reaffirmed that this is the work that I want to do. Wow. It is inspiring to hear how your placement has been so impactful in your clinical and overall professional journey. How do you think health psychology fits into the scope of providing mental health services? I think health psychology has done a great job of helping me to conceptualize clients using a biopsychosocial model. I am actively working to understand even more about health psychology and how its influence is critical in providing holistic care for patients. You'll graduate. You'll have your Mental Health Counseling degree. You'll be equipped to serve and make a real impact. What do you envision as your dream job? What are you working toward? Though I love the field of counseling and I am excited to continue my work as a counselor after graduation, counseling is not what I see myself doing forever. Initially after graduation, I want to pursue licensure as an LPC (licensed professional counselor) and get some work experience in a new city. After obtaining my license, I would like to pursue a doctoral degree, either in counseling psychology or counselor education. I am leaning more towards counselor education because my dream job is to teach future counselors much like my professors are doing for me. You have some big aspirations. Graduate school is rewarding but it can also be very taxing and it's important to find balance, especially when the bulk of your time is giving out energy. What do you do to refuel your energy? The concept of self-care is tricky. Sometimes I don't engage in self-care to be honest. But I do my best to squeeze it in where I can. A lot of my self-care involves me listening to my body and giving myself grace to stop doing homework if I'm falling asleep or if my head is pounding or if I just don't have anything else left to give. I do my best to get my school work done during the weekdays so that I can enjoy the weekends to myself. I am an introvert so spending time alone is vital for me. I also try my best to visit my partner, who lives a few hours away, as often as possible and spend time with friends and family when I have the energy to do so.

Portrait of Cassandra Bray

Cassandra Bray

Cassandra Bray is the Executive Director for Live Forward, an organization serving people living with HIV and their households. Live Forward's mission is to build healthier communities through stable housing, improved health management, strong community outreach, and widespread prevention services.

The goal of the organization is to ensure that individuals diagnosed with HIV live with dignity and have access to a positive quality of life. Cassandra is responsible for managing the day to day operations of the agency. She is very passionate about her mission to serve their clients, most of which are living in extreme low-income environments. She began working in public health in 1988, where her first job was working on an AIDS Surveillance Project with the State of Georgia and CDC. That project led her to doing street outreach and prevention and later case management.

She enjoys working with the AIDS/HIV population, specifically for Live Forward. The positive advancements that occurred since 1988 has motivated Cassandra to continue doing this work. At one point, she says "the first seven years of HIV/AIDS was like a death sentence and now people who manage their disease properly can expect to live a near normal life expectancy. I believe that in the next five to seven years a functional cure for HIV will exist." Her optimism and dedication to advocacy has been a consistent theme throughout her career. Through her role at Live Forward, she works with her team and community partners to address stigma and shame through case management, support groups and workshops. She knows first-hand how important these resources are to her population; she described witnessing incidences in which individuals have died because they refused to address their health. Tragic stories such as these inspire Live Forward to continue efforts to provide education, resources, and support to their patients.

While Cassandra's work is rewarding, she is sometimes presented with challenges. She stated, that "people are actually surprised when I state that assisting clients with managing their HIV is sometimes the easiest part of our job. Most of our clients have one or more co-morbidities which is complicated by problems of extreme poverty." Cassandra is tasked with assisting clients from a whole-person perspective, considering the management of mental health, substance use, fractured families/support systems, money management, housing instability, employment, and resource accessibility. Live Forward provides housing, case management, and supportive services to address these disparities. In addition, Live Forward does not bill for services and thanks to the wonderful volunteers and interns, clients are able to receive free services. Cassandra and her staff are wonderful examples of how impactful integrated services can be in saving lives and building healthier communities.

Portrait of Jessica Taylor

Jessica Taylor

Jessica Taylor is a 2nd year graduate student at the University of Georgia pursuing her masters degree in Professional Counseling. After graduating from the program in May 2019, Jessica plans to work in a family-oriented school setting where she aims to prepare students for college and career readiness as a school counselor. Jessica shared that she is inspired to make a difference through supporting, advocating, planting seeds, and fostering safe places for students to share, process, explore their emotions. Her eyes lit up as she stated, "seeing my student learn to cope, preserve, and gain deeper insights motivates me to show up every day and meet each student where they are." Her dedication is admirable, her mission is commendable, and her goal to become school counselor of the year is aspirational.

Before graduating and becoming the student advocate every school and community needs, Jessica shared her personal and professional journey to discovering her purpose.

Why did you decide to be in the helping profession?

I am the daughter of two social workers and have always envisioned myself helping others. When I was younger, I dreamed of becoming a nurse like my grandmother and helping others to heal their wounds. I graduated from high school as a Certified Nursing Assistant. After Thomson High School, I went out of state to attend Alabama A&M University on a tennis scholarship majoring in Biology. In undergrad, I joined different service organizations, which opened my eyes to education and working children and adolescents. Next, I applied to be a college advisor with the Georgia College Advising Corps. I worked with first generation, low- income, and underrepresented students and families. I have helped students apply for colleges, FAFSA, and scholarships. Through this role, I also helped students with the academic and social-emotional challenges that impacted their academic performance.

What clinical population are you most interested in working with? Why?

I would love to work with all children and adolescents. I enjoy helping and connecting underserved and low-income students and families to resources.

Where is your clinical placement?

I am currently placed at Pharr Elementary (PK- 5) for my internship in Gwinnett County. We are a Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) school. We serve about 690 students in the Grayson cluster within the Gwinnett County Public School System. 41% of our families met the need for free or reduced lunch. Our school demographics are: 7.1% Asian/ Pacific Islander, 0.1% American Indian/ Alaskan Native, 38.5% Black, 18.3% Hispanic, 7.4% Multi-racial, and 28.6% White. It is important to highlight that 18.1% of our students are English learners.

What is your title at your placement? What are your responsibilities at your placement?

I am a School Counseling Intern at Pharr Elementary. As an intern, I meet with my students and address academic, social-emotional, and career needs through individual meetings, small groups, and classroom lessons. I am currently running small groups for Mindfulness, Decision Making, Divorce, and Study Skills/ Habits. I actively attend Student Support Team (SST) meetings for students on my caseload. The SST team consists of a teacher, administrator, counselor, and school psychologist. The team collaboratively addresses academic, medical, behavioral, emotional and/or other problems which may interfere with a student's ability to obtain an appropriate education.

What are a few important things you have learned at your placement?

I have learned the logistics behind running a comprehensive school counseling program. In collaboration with my supervisor, I have been afforded the opportunity to plan upcoming events, lessons, and counseling calendar. My placement has trained me on the district's protocol for suicidal ideation and child lures through professional development. I feel extremely supported and empowered to handle a range of issues. Pharr Elementary has taught to collaborate and communicate with teachers, parents, stakeholders, and community leaders.

How has the field of health psychology helped you at your placement?

I integrate health psychology into every facet of my position. I sit in on the Student Support Team, Individualized Education Program (IEP), and 504 Plans' meetings. These integrated teams take a holistic approach to the students' academic success, modifications, and accommodations. I have also been able to incorporate health psychology into my mindfulness small group, where I teach students how to be aware of the here and now through breathing and calming techniques, provide psychoeducation on the negative effects of stress and easy to apply stress management strategies.

What will your master's thesis/dissertation be on?

I am working on an internship project for my master's program. For my project, I am focusing on test anxiety within the elementary level. I aim to increase the number of counseling lessons on study skills, psychoeducation on the effects of testing, and coping strategies. I have a goal of meeting with 100% of the 5th-grade classes, delivering counseling lessons on test anxiety to 5th-grade homerooms, and developing resources for families.

What do you do for self-care? How do you take care of YOU?

I have found a new love for dog parks, coloring, and meditating. Recently, I like playing with my new puppy, Rudy. I am appreciating the fresh air and moments to interact with other dog parents. Coloring is an old hobby that I have picked back up after taking an expressive art class. Also, I have recently been practicing yoga and meditation to center myself and to adopt informed mindfulness facilitation.

Conference Presentations

2020

  • Chapman-Hilliard, C., Pace, S., Pelham., T., Holmes, E., Doe, E., McCalla, J. (2020). Using a Black History Knowledge Framework across Therapeutic Modalities and in Community Advocacy. Symposium will be presented at the Counseling Psychology Conference, New Orleans, LA.
  • Pace, S., Doe, E., Chapman-Hilliard, C. (2020). My Ancestors Taught Me. Roundtable will be presented at the Counseling Psychology Conference, New Orleans, LA.
  • Pace, S., Holmes, E., Pelham, T., Chapman-Hilliard, C. (2020). When Brown-Skinned Girls Heal: A Model for Support Groups for African American Women. Roundtable will be presented at the American Psychological Association Conference, Washington, DC.

2019

  • Ajetomobi, R. & Heckman, B. (2019) Behavioral chronic pain management: Factors related to uptake and adherence. Presented at Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) conference. Jacksonville, FL.
  • Alvis, D., Rupnaraine, S., Shay, J., & Styles, J. (2019). Developing Clinical, Consulting, Training, and Research Skills Within a Biopsychosocial Framework: Reflections and Discussion with Health Psychologists in Training. Presentation at Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Alvis, D., Rupnaraine, S., Shay, J., & Styles, J. (2019, March). Developing Clinical, Consulting, Training, and Research Skills Within a Biopsychosocial Framework: Reflections and Discussion with Health Psychologists in Training. Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Blizzard, J., Heckman, B., Shay, J., and Eaton, E. (2019). Personality and Mindfulness Practice: Does Personality Predict Engagement in Mindfulness for College Students? Poster presentation at the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior's Mind Brain Research Day, Brown University, Providence, RI.
  • Blizzard, J., Heckman, B., Shay, J., and Eaton, E. (2019, March). Personality and Mindfulness Practice: Does Personality Predict Engagement in Mindfulness for College Students? Poster presented at the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior's Mind Brain Research Day, Brown University, Providence, RI.
  • Chapman-Hilliard, C., Holmes, E., Pace, S. (2019). The Psychological Significance of Black History Knowledge. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit, Denver, CO.
  • Chapman-Hilliard, C., Pace, S., Holmes, E. (2019). The Role of Black History Knowledge in Predicting Mental Health and Coping Responses Among Black Americans. Poster presented at the annual Association of Black Psychologists Conference, Orlando, FL.
  • Clay-Potts, A., Thacker, E., McGarrah, M., Pace, S., Powers, D. (2019). From the Voices of Students: Social justice Training and Identifying Training Growth Edges. Symposium presented at the annual Cross-Cultural Counseling and Education Conference for Research, Action, and Change, Savannah, GA.
  • Daigle, J., Calhoun, G., The Project Be Ahead Integrative Healthcare Training Team (2019). Behavioral and integrated health care training for counselors who work with children. Presented at American Counseling Association (ACA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Doe, E., Pace, S., Holmes, E., Chapman-Hilliard, C. (2019). Black History Knowledge as a Clinical Intervention Tool. Poster presented at the annual Association of Black Psychologists Conference, Orlando, FL.
  • Doe, E., Pace, S., Holmes, E., Chapman-Hilliard, C. (2019). Examining Critical Consciousness, Eating concerns, and Body Image Among Diverse Women. Poster presented at the annual convention of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit, Denver, CO.
  • Heckman, B., & Rupnaraine, S. (2019, March). The Role of Pain Catastrophizing on Pain Outcomes in a Racially Diverse Group. Presented at Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Heckman, B., Lauckner, C., McKinney, E., & Rupnaraine, S. (2019, March). Project MIGHT: Mental Health Intervention for Georgians with HIV/AIDS using Telehealth. Presented at Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Heckman, B., Pace, S., Powers, D., Rogers, A., Rupnaraine, S., Shay., & Okun, J. (2019, March). Project BE-AHEAD: Behavioral Health Development in Georgia. Presented at Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Heckman, B., Pace, S., Powers, D., Rogers, A., Rupnaraine, S., Shay, J., & Okun, J. (2019). Project BE-AHEAD: Behavioral Health Development in Georgia. Poster presentation at Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Gimbel, N.M. & Alvis, D. (2019, March). Mindfulness and Self-care for Psychologists and other Healthcare Providers. Poster presented at conference of Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Pace, S., Powers, D., McGarrah, M., Thacker, E., Clay-Potts, A. (2019). Experiencing the Disconnect: Microaggressions in Counseling from a Student Clinician Perspective. Symposium presented at the annual Cross-Cultural Counseling and Education Conference for Research, Action, and Change, Savannah, GA.
  • Phelps, R., Holmes, E., Pelham, T., & Zhang, S. (March 2019). Breaking the Silence: Addressing Mental Health Issues in Underrepresented Populations. Well-Being in International College Student Populations. CEPO Symposium conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Rogers, A., Gimbel, N.M., Pace, S., Powers, D., Rupnaraine, S., Shay, J., Okun, J., & Heckman, B. (2019, March). Project BE-AHEAD: Behavioral Health Development in Georgia (Poster Session). Poster presented at conference of Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Shay, J., Rupnaraine, S., Styles, J., Connelly, C., Oh, J., Alvis, D., & Heckman, B. (March, 2019). Developing clinical, consulting, training, and research skills within a biopsychosocial framework: Reflections and discussion with health psychologists in training. Panel discussion presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association 2019 Annual Meeting, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Styles, J. (2019, September). Linking Integrated Health Networks for Kids in Schools. Presentation conducted at the State of Education conference, Athens, GA.
  • Styles, J., Daigle, J., Oh, J., Alvis, B., Bigham, L., Rogers, A., Okin, J., Ford, D., Weaver-Runyan, N., Heckman, B., (2019, September). Outcomes of Increasing Behavioral Health & Integrated Care in K-12 Schools. Poster presented at conference of the 2019 State of Education in Georgia, Athens. GA.
  • Zhang S., Rogers, A., Ajetomobi, R., Alvis, D., Heckman, B. (2019). Integrating mindfulness in behavioral health: Primary care settings. Conversation hour presented at Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Zhang, S., & Oh, J. (March 2019). 33-year Content Analysis of Health Psychology Research in Counseling Psychology. Poster presentation conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Zhang, S., Rogers, A., Ajetomobi, R., Alvis, D., & Heckman, B. (March 2019). Integrating Mindfulness in Behavioral Health – Primary Care Settings. Conversation Hour conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Jacksonville, FL.

2018

  • Daigle, J., Heckman, B., Calhoun, G., Styles, J. (March, 2018). Behavioral and Integrated Healthcare Training for Counselors who Work with Children. Poster presented at conference of American Counseling Association, New Orleans, LA.
  • Khan, H., & Zhang, S. (October, 2018). Latinx Muslims: An Intersectional Exploration of Lived Experiences. Poster presentation conducted at the 2018 National Latina/o Psychological Association Biennial Conference, San Diego, CA.
  • Khan, H., Fair, J., & Zhang, S. (March, 2018). Impact of Experiential Perspective of Intersecting Identities on Pedagogy. Symposium conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Charleston, SC.
  • Parker, S., McDonald, J., McKinney E., Zhang, S., Heckman, B., & Rogers, A. (March 2018). People Living with HIV: Psychological and Treatment-Seeking Behaviors. Poster presentation conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Charleston, SC.
  • Rogers, A., Gimbel, N., Rupnaraine, S., Okun, J., Styles, J., Oh, J., Weaver, J., Shay, J., Pace, S., Powers, D., Alvis, D., Heckman. (March, 2018). PROJECT BE-AHEAD: Behavioral Health Development in Georgia. Poster presented at conference of Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL
  • Styles, J., Heckman, B., (March, 2018). Protective Effects of Purpose & Religious/Spiritual Well-Being in Men. Poster presented at conference of Southeastern Psychological Association, Jacksonville, FL.
  • Whitford, J., Harmon, R., & Rupnaraine, S. (2018, March). Polytrauma/TBI Psychology. Presented at VHA training, Augusta, GA.
  • Whitford, J., Rupnaraine, S., & Harmon, R. (August, 2018). Assessment of Musculoskeletal Origins of Headache in Patients With Combined TBI and PTSD. Present at American Psychological Association Convention, San Francisco, CA.
  • Zhang, S. (February, 2018). Weather Adaptation, Stress and its Physical and Psychological Effects on International Students at a large U.S. University. Poster presentation conducted at the annual research fair of the Department of Counseling Psychology at University of Georgia, Athens, GA.
  • Zhang, S. (March, 2018). Chinese International Students' Stress, Stigma, and Barriers to Seeking Counseling. Poster presentation conducted at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Conference, Charleston, SC.
  • Zhang, S. (May, 2018). Weather Adaptation, Stress, and its Physical and Psychological Effects on International Students at a Large U.S. University. Poster presentation conducted at the Applied Psychological Science Conference, San Francisco, CA.
  • Zhang, S., Songkeng, K., & Wang, Y. (September, 2018). Adjusting to Thrive - Acculturation Stress of International Students and Their Stories. Workshop panelist at Engage! Conference 2018, Athens, GA.
  • Zhang, S., Tadik, H., Cai, W, & Shi, X. (October, 2018). Panelist speaker at the Counseling and Psychiatric Services at University Health Center monthly workshop, Athens, GA.

2017

  • Bigham, L., Okun, J. D., Oh, J., Ford, D., Heckman, B., & Daigle, J. (March, 2017). Increasing Behavioral Health & Integrated Care in K-12 Schools. Poster presented at the 38th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, San Diego, CA.

2016

  • Daigle, J., Heckman, B., Bigham, L., Ford, D., Okun, J., Oh, J., Rupnaraine, S. (March, 2016). Integrating behavioral health in the school counseling curriculum. Symposium presented at the Innovations in Best Practices in School Counselor Preparation Conference, Athens, GA.

Contact Us

PI: Bernadette Davantes Heckman

427F Aderhold Hall 110 Carlton St. Athens, GA 30602